Posted in My Duwamish Adventure

Jack Block Park – Port of Seattle

This park was dedicated in 1997 after the Port of Seattle cleaned up quite a bit of pollution from the prior owners. They also developed the land south of this park into Terminal 5. Those that follow my posts will remember the trouble I got into at the SE security gate. If not here is that post and a global view of T-5. Terminal 5 Trouble  &  Terminal 5 from Jack Block Park

Dedication of Park in 1997
Dedication of Park in 1997

This park is surrounded by chain link fences that keep us the public out of Terminal 5 and two old rail road approaches to the water.  Not sure why the port left them intact but they do make for some interesting viewing spots. They built mini pedestrian bridges and a viewing tower to allow us to view the city and water but not trespass on the old docks.

The first old dock you come to is not far from one of the parking lots. It has the best view of the rails leading to the dock and how we are built out of that area.

Imagine them loading lumber on this ramp
Imagine them loading lumber on this ramp

How about a closer look at this old ramp?

Ramp with high tide debris
Ramp with high tide debris

And even closer so you can see the rot and deterioration.  Not sure this is even a viable ramp any more.

Rail ramp showing some wear
Rail ramp showing some wear
Old Rail Ramp surrounded by park
Old Rail Ramp surrounded by park

As I walked around to the area you see in the distance with green grass I got some photos looking back at the barges and this old ramp.

Looking back at rail ramp
Looking back at rail ramp

From the park dock that was built for us to enjoy the bay views from, I took some great shots of the city and Elliott Bay.

Seattle view from Jack Block Park
Seattle view from Jack Block Park
The Needle from West Seattle
The Needle from West Seattle

At the end of my adventure here I took the road that winds through fenced areas.  From that ground level side I got the next two photos of the rail that leads to the old wooden ramp. Can you imagine the old lumber mill using this to load and unload their product.

Old Rail Ramp to Bay with Crow guarding

Old Rail Ramp to Bay with Crow guarding

Barge parked on old rail ramp at Jack Block Park
Small viewing bridge  and barge parked on old rail ramp

That company was in this spot almost 100 years and times certainly have changed for Seattle. It used to be a lumber town and now it is a hub of technology and computer science.  One has to wonder if this latest boom will lead to a bust like after the Gold Rush to Alaska in the 1890s & 1900s and the 1970s when we asked the last person leaving Seattle to turn the lights out.

Getting to the river is near impossible from this park. I wondered if I could go off trail and climb my way to the mouth of the river. Check out the next post to see how I did going rogue and some views from around the viewing tower.

To see all of my Duwamish Adventure I have a directory post that links all of the pieces together.  You can find that post here – My Duwamish Adventure Directory

Posted in My Duwamish Adventure

Kellogg Island – North View

Are you ready for more Duwamish River?

In my adventure along the river, I am now traversing the west bank adjacent to the north end of Kellogg Island.  Last week I did a post around the island and some views of the southern end.  If you wish to brush up on that first here is the link – Kellogg Island – Southern views

The featured picture gives you a good overall view of the island looking south toward its northern end.  The sun came out and highlighted the water and the industry that surrounds this little natural place.

The T-107 park has a few informational signs showing some history of the area.  Here is an 1875 map of the area showing where Kellogg Island sits. It was part of a larger island at the original mouth of the river before Harbor Island was created out of the tidal mud flats with fill.

US Coast & Geodetic Survey Sheet T-1406 - Duwamish Bay, Washington Territory 1874 - courtesy U of WA Burke Museum
US Coast & Geodetic Survey Sheet T-1406 – Duwamish Bay, Washington Territory 1874 – courtesy U of WA Burke Museum

The island is around 1/4 mile long and is a wild place with trees and brambles. Some folks have gone there via boat or slogged through the mud during low tide.  I don’t recommend the latter method since the mud could be quicksand like.  I took the next series of photos of the shore starting with mid island to the north tip.

Kellogg Island West shore with Cement Plant in distance
Kellogg Island West shore with Cement Plant in distance
Shoreline of Island in Duwamish River
Shoreline of Island in Duwamish River
Cranes and mist over Kellogg Island
Cranes and mist over Kellogg Island
Kellogg Island looking East at north end
Kellogg Island looking East at north end
Cranes and barges at northern tip of Kellogg Island, Duwamish River
Cranes and barges at northern tip of Kellogg Island, Duwamish River

I leave you with a close up of the northern end of the island.  The natural elements are overshadowed by the industry that surrounds this area.

Northern tip of Kellogg Island - birds & barges
Northern tip of Kellogg Island – birds & barges

To see more of my Duwamish Adventure I have a directory post that links all of the pieces together.  You can find that post here – My Duwamish Adventure Directory

Posted in History and other topics

Georgetown Old Grocery – Gas Station

When I left the Georgetown Steam Plant I saw this sad deserted Grocery.  I found that this building was originally built in 1917.  It was the Chris M Perovich Grocery for many years. At some point in recent history it became Mini Mart City Park.  Then it was left to rot.

Time gone by Grocery at 6525 Corson Ave, Seattle, WA
Time gone by Grocery at 6525 Ellis Ave, Seattle, WA

A local artist has built a folk art rock sculpture (Georgetown resident Louie Moss) which includes extensive rock, petrified wood and stone design elements has been added to the east side of the building. It has been the subject of some controversy within the Georgetown community.

Folk Art on front of old Grocery in Georgetown
Folk Art on front of old Grocery in Georgetown

This buildings future is unknown but it is listed by the city in its inventory of Georgetown historical sites.

One last note for you is my grandparents ran a small local grocery gas station in the Northgate area.  This was in the 1930s and 40s and my grandmother sold Shell Gas using the old glass type pumps.  Funny how today a month later I took a picture of one of these old style pumps.

Old Gas Pump in Duwamish River back yard.
Old Gas Pump in Duwamish River back yard.

 

Posted in History and other topics

Seattle Malting & Brewing – Rainier Beer Roots

Last weekend I went to an estate sale published to be in the Old Rainier Brewery.  I went to this sale just because I wanted to investigate the old Georgetown brewing buildings.   They are that old red brick kind that go for blocks along Airport Way. I have memories of my mom going downtown before the freeway along this street and using it for years as a quick route north.  It was at one point 885 feet of old building right next to a two lane road.  It gave me childhood wonder of old things and history every time we went by.

I found after I drove around the buildings twice that the sale was in the next generation Rainier Brewery that was further north.  That is the building that many of us in Seattle know from the Big R on top of it beside the I-5 Freeway. In the end the sale was good because I found a couple of Worlds Fair items that were not advertised and even under priced.

However, today’s article is about the first brewery I went to, the Seattle Malting and Brewing Company. This was the roots of Rainier Beer and a huge operation in its day.

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According to History Link.Org and Paul Dorpat these buildings were built around 1900. The brewery by 1904 was the largest brewery west of the Mississippi River and with addition upon addition through 1912 it became “world class” – the sixth largest in the world. For a time before Washington State introduced prohibition in 1916, the Georgetown brewery was the largest industrial establishment in the state of Washington.  Here is a link to read a little bit more on the brewery and a picture taken by Asahel Curtis when it was still a new building.

http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=3001

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This photo shows how the area has been revitalized with new businesses.  The Frans candy company has a lovely boutique type sales area with manufacturing behind it.  I saw a small box for sale at the grocery store later that day and we loved the salted caramels.

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This next photo is a good past and present.  See the old buildings embellishments next to a modern times outdoor light.   Even that light isn’t that new but in comparison it is a late comer.

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The back of any place has some dirty underwear showing.  Check out the over 100-year-old stairway with a ladder for easy access.

Hope you enjoyed a little Seattle history.