Posted in Georgetown Steam Plant

Haunted Georgetown Steam Plant

When I got home from my adventure at the Georgetown Steam Plant I quickly looked at my 180 plus photos.  I discovered some disturbing things that I cannot explain except that they are paranormal.  The one that really caught my eye was where a heap of electrical cable was piled.  The last photo in the series is a glow and I have no explanation for this.

Let me set the stage for this.  I had already walked around the big boiler room area. That area as you can see from the other posts was large, creepy and a step into the past.  As I turned the corner back at the entrance end I saw this pile of cable.  Not sure why I was so fascinated by this ugly pile but here is the series of photos I took.

Electrical Cable - close up - 1st photo no flash
Electrical Cable – close up – 1st photo no flash
Pile of cable - 2nd photo with flash
Pile of cable – 2nd photo with flash
pile of cable - 3rd photo no flash
pile of cable – 3rd photo no flash

In this next fourth photo where did the glow come from?  This room has limited light and no way is this from an outside source or my camera.  I had the flash turned off and you can check the photo properties if you like.  I almost thought it was my shaking the camera but look at how clear the cable looks.

Glowing pile - final photo & no flash
Glowing pile – final photo & no flash

Next set of photos that had something creepy going on is a set of boiler doors.  These two doors are right across from the cable.  Coincidence?

Boiler doors - no flash taken after creepy photo
Boiler doors – no flash taken after creepy photo
Little Boiler door close up
Little Boiler door close up

At first I thought again this was just a bad photo moment.  However, with no flash used and the bands of light coming from the door it makes me wonder… is this a spirit or a poltergeist living in the boiler room?

The light is coming from or around the smaller boiler door
The light is coming from or around the smaller boiler door

The last example I have is not as obvious but has a higher creepy factor.  It is when I went back down those enclosed cement stairs that reminded me of Alcatraz.  By accident I took a picture of the stairs with my feet in the picture.  I don’t like to get my shadow or body in pictures.  No selfies for me.

Neither of these two pictures used a flash but in the one with my feet it has a glow or some unexplained aura. Yes it was right at my feet. Glad I was holding onto the railing. Remember my fear of heights in earlier posts.  That was a good thing I hung on huh?

Staircase after the glowing photo with my feet.
Staircase after the glowing photo with my feet. – No Flash used.
No flash photo with light blob glowing at my feet.
No flash photo with light blob glowing at my feet.

I could not find much on the Steam Plant being haunted.  The one thing I did find was the Georgetown Halloween walk from a prior year mentioned that the building might have a poltergeist.  That would explain the glowing lights on the cable and boiler door.  However, the glow in the stairs were more like a spirit due to the temperature and bad vibe I had.

What do you think?  Not sure we will ever really know but this world has lots of things we can’t explain.

Want more of the Georgetown Steam Plant?  Go to my master post on this subject for the other topics around this historic place.

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Posted in Georgetown Steam Plant

Flock of Starlings arrive on Steam Plant

After I was done with the interior of the Georgetown Steam Plant, I walked around the entire building.  Of course I took photos as I went and got really cold hands in the deal. It was so worth it for the magnificent views of the building’s Neo Classical style.

Early on I had seen a huge flock of birds moving around Boeing field which this building borders. I hoped they were crows but instead they were starlings.  Not as noble a bird but just as awesome.  To my delight they landed on the building while I was photographing.

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Want more of the Georgetown Steam Plant?  Go to my master post on this subject for the other topics around this historic place.

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Georgetown Steam Plant Building of time gone by

My trip to Seattle Electric Company 1906 building aka Georgetown Steam Plant was a step back in time mechanically and technologically.

Machines and more machines
Machines and more machines

If you look behind this machine you will see the elevator cage that is used to store signs. This cage does not belong to the building but I found the iron work lovely.

Elevator cage iron work
Elevator cage iron work

Then there is the boiler room, a combination of pipes, doors and dials.  Add to this a creepy factor that we all discussed as we stood there in awe.

Big Boiler Room - 8 to each side
Big Boiler Room – 8 to each side
Boilers with Seattle Electric Company on them.
Boilers with Seattle Electric Company on them.

 

Boiler doors
Boiler doors

I leave you with one of  the turbines or the heart of the plant.

 

Curtis Turbine
Curtis Turbine

Want more of the Georgetown Steam Plant?  Go to my master post on this subject for the other topics around this historic place.

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Posted in Georgetown Steam Plant

Georgetown Steam Plant Pipes

The 1906 Steam Plant was full of pipes large and small.  They were made of brass, metal and painted over in different colors.  They carried oil, water, steam and who knows what else.

Lets have a walk around the plant and see what we can find.

Look up and you see pipes

The ceiling is a honeycomb of piping.
The ceiling is a honeycomb of piping.

These brass pipes were on the side of the turbines.  Oil or steam?

Brass pipes
Brass pipes

Up in the boiler room the pipes and valves were everywhere.  When I looked between the boilers looking to the west sunshine I got this photo. The spooky factor was high in this room.

Creepy space between boilers
Creepy space between boilers

The boilers were eight on each side.  Down at the southern end of the long room the light streamed in from a window high up.  It gave this shot of the front of the boilers two different tones of color.  Add more pipes and gauges to the picture for a good photo opportunity.

Front of two boilers
Front of two boilers

Later you will see a picture of the coiled heavy electrical cable that I was drawn to.  After I took several photos of that I weaved behind that area and found this huge pipe and valve wheel.

Big pressure pipe and control wheel.
Big pressure pipe and control wheel.

I leave you with two more sets of pipes at the Steam Plant.

Want more of the Georgetown Steam Plant?  Go to my master post on this subject for the other topics around this historic place.

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Posted in Georgetown Steam Plant

Seattle Steam Plant Gauges of time

Georgetown Steam Plant was full of gauges and control panels.  Let’s talk about visual overload for my camera and me.

Similar to the Seattle Electric Company Plant Stairways post let us go around the building in order that I saw them.

At first I was fascinated by these oilers.  The workmanship of the brass and glass is from a time before things were made in foreign countries.

This next piece of the machinery must have twirled and turned as the machine worked.

imagine this in motion
imagine this in motion

Then I turned to the big generator made by General Electric over 100 years ago.  Not only do I have good shots of its inner workings but of the manufacture’s plate.

Generator up close
Generator up close

Let us get down to the gauges and there was plenty of them.  Some looked like they belonged on a ship and some had pipes and faucets around them.  A delight to the mechanical eye.

In the boiler room area there was a few tools and other odd things from the century past.  They were dusty and just lying around like the workers had left them decades ago. This added to the unsettling feeling that I had interrupted someone. I was fascinated by this old heater and how its coils on the outside were visually delightful.

Old space heater a graphic treat
Old space heater a graphic treat

Remember the mystery stairs photo?  At the same time I came out of the boiler room and took that shot I captured the control panels on the third level. This multiple tier kind of reminded me of Alcatraz too.

Control Panels of yesterday look like today
Control Panels of yesterday looks modern

This next photo gives you a better look at the start stop dial and the wench hook that hung from the ceiling. I recently received a comment from Clyde Furd who told me that the dial may look like a clock (which is what I thought it was originally) but it really shows the electrical output of the plant when it is running. It has numbers from 0 to 25 megawatts.  The hook in the upper right corner is a 50 ton crane.

Start Stop clock and control panels
Start Stop clock and control panels

Want more of the Georgetown Steam Plant?  Go to my master post on this subject for the other topics around this historic place.

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Posted in Georgetown Steam Plant

Seattle Electric Company Plant Stairways

The Steam Plant in Georgetown had some amazing stairway photo opportunities.  The site is multiple leveled so the workers could get to all the huge machinery in the building.

The feature photo was one I captured when looking at gauges.  Then I saw light from the big windows at the back of the building was illuminating the stairs and pipes.

Let us take a tour of the stairs in the building.  I am going to show you them in order of my discovery.  We entered the building by the back big door.  Then were directed to the left to circle around into the machinery area on the main floor.  The other option was to take the back stairs up to the second level.  I opted for machinery first.   This photo looks back toward the entrance and combines lots of visual variety.

Machinery, pipes and stairs
Machinery, pipes and stairs

After I wandered around the machinery I decided to take these enclosed stairs.  They wind up and into an office that had old newspaper articles. Having been to Alcatraz years ago I would say this set of stairs was just as spooky. Guess I picked creepy over the back stairs that made me queasy with height phobia.

Speaking of those back stairs that made my fear of heights act up.  Here is a shot of them from the second floor.  I had a hard time overpowering my fear to get close to the rail here.

This area gave me leapaphobia
This area gave me leapaphobia

After I wandered around the boiler area that continued to sustain the creepy feeling, I came upon this set of stairs going up towards the top of the boilers.  To the side were more oven type doors but they were painted red vs the black ones lower on the boilers.

Stairs upward in boiler room
Stairs upward in boiler room

Next when I moved back into the room with the turbines, I looked up behind the control panels and saw this next staircase.  It seemed to be lighted from the roof and I couldn’t tell where it came from or went.  Thus I named it mystery stairs.

Mystery stairs in rooftop distance
Mystery stairs in rooftop distance

Then the last shot I took was of the one at the back of the building.  Full circle was made.

Back of the house stairs to second level
Back of the house stairs to second level

Want more of the Georgetown Steam Plant?  Go to my master post on this subject for the other topics around this historic place.

More on Georgetown Steam Plant

 

Posted in Georgetown Steam Plant

Georgetown Steam Plant

Tucked away at the north end of Boeing Field sits a building that looks like it is out-of-place.  It has 1906 on the header and old windows looking out of an early reinforced concrete construction with neo-classical ornamentation.

1906 caught my eye from the road
1906 caught my eye from the road
Number 1 Steam Plant in Seattle
Number 1 Steam Plant in Seattle

What is this place I wondered several years ago while looking for an estate sale in Georgetown.  I found that it is the Seattle Electric Company’s  first Steam Plant.  It was built on 18 acres near the Duwamish River and provided both direct and alternating current to it’s customers.  The main ones being the Interurban Railway streetcar and the city of Georgetown (before it was annexed into Seattle).

Old front doors of Steam Plant in Seattle
Old front doors of Steam Plant in Seattle

The coolest thing is this Steam Plant is the last working example of vertical Curtis Turbines manufactured by General Electric in 1907.  This is described as the beginning of the end of reciprocating steam engine dominance in electrical power generation.

DSCN6929
Seattle Steam Plant Generators

The building was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1984 joining famous places like the Brooklyn Bridge and the USS Constitution. It is also designated by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers as a National Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark (see placque below).  Plus the building is a Seattle City Landmark and is on the Washington State Register of Historic Places.

National Historic Mechnical Engeneering Landmark Placque
National Historic Mechnical Engeneering Landmark Placque

Duwamish Revealed, a series of art installations that celebrate Seattle’s only river which I subscribe to due to my love of the Duwamish hosted an event at the Steam Plant.  I jumped at the opportunity to get inside the building.  They had a dance troop performing there.  Sorry to say art people, but I was so busy taking photos that I missed the performance. I took so many pictures that I am going to break my blog posts into several. Just too much for one post. By the way I took over 180 pictures in 2 hours. That is a lot of shutter time.

Here is a directory of the posts:

  • General Information – this post Georgetown Steam Plant
  • Stairs – Seattle Electric Company Plant Stairways  – Stairs
  • Gauges – Seattle Steam Plant Gauges of time –   Gauges
  • Pipes – Georgetown Steam Plant Pipes –  Pipes
  • Georgetown Steam Plant Building of time gone by – time gone by
  • Flock of Starlings arrive on Steam Plant –  Starlings
  • Haunted Georgetown Steam Plant –   Haunted?