Posted in Birds and other fun topics

2019 by Robin at Crows of Arroyos

What a year it was 2019. I retired from 37 years at GES and have survived my first 6 months of a new life.

It is a good time to re-vamp and re-visit Crows of Arroyos. In November I crossed the nine year mark and today I gave her a new suit of clothes. Hope you like the new format/theme I picked. Plus, thought I would share with you the highlights old and new at Crows of Arroyos.

The raw 2019 statistics are a good starting point:

  • 113 posts
  • 29,074 words
  • 8,090 views
  • 5,191 visitors
  • 630 likes
  • 63 comments

I stuck with my tried and true topics such as:

  • Crow babies, Crows of the Hood & Beach
  • Nature’s serendipity moments on my Puget Sound beaches – Ocean View & Cove Park
  • Waterfalls – revisited Coal Creek in Cougar Mountain Regional Park and hiked 6 miles to see Doughty Falls after our one day rain record right before Christmas.

Some new topics I feasted on:

  • How to find an Old Coal Mine – Adventured several times to find century old mines hidden in suburbia.
  • In the midst of a rain storm ran into a gregarious Spotted Sandpiper.  A new bird spotting to add to my bird list.

Experimented with daily photo flashes:

  • Just Black & White – 9 of these where I used the software GIMP to desaturate some photos.
  • Color Flash – 20 photos of Fall Bright colors including leaves, flowers & toadstools.
  • Bird Flash – 33 one time snapshots of different birds that crossed my path.
  • Very Berry – 11 winter berry fun to show there is color even in the darkest days of the year.

Now lets talk about the top posts for 2019. This is what my readers found of interest  within my whole portfolio of 837 posts. By the way, my all-time views are 51,564 and 27,581 visitors.

Number Five most viewed site was……Duwamish – Kellogg Island with 187 views

Kellogg Island backwater side
  • I wrote this post as part of a series I called My Duwamish Adventure. In 2015 I walked as close to the river as I could.  I started at a park called Cecil Moses Park where the river changes into the Green River.  I made it all the way to the mouth at Jack Block Park.  A lot of walking in between.
  • This article is about a special place on the Duwamish River.  It is the only remaining piece of the original river before it was dredged and made the industrial waterway it is today.
  • The link to the post is – Kellogg Island
  • If you want to see all of my Duwamish Adventure here is a summary post with many links – Duwamish Adventure Directory
  • Here is the video I made called “Our Only River”.  This was the finale of the series.

Number Four most viewed site was …..Crow Pellet with 321 views.

Crow Pellet – interesting look at what this crow was eating
  • One of my crow followers landed a few feet from me on an old piling and proceeded to throw up.   I was kind of shocked and yet sort of honored that he felt comfortable enough to do his regurgitation in front of me.
  • The link to this May 2012 post is Crow Throw – up.  Be warned not for the faint of heart.

Number Three most viewed site was …..Crow Idioms – Eat Crow and As the Crow Flies with 332 views.

  • These two idioms are prime examples of how many do not like crows but they do respect them for their intelligence and sleek black beauty.
  • There is a back story to this post that I did not reveal at the time I wrote it in September of 2016.  It was triggered by an episode at work where I got mad and yelled at a couple of people at work. I can say now that they wanted to break rules and I told them under no certain terms that it was a bad idea. They were unremorseful and told their manager I was harassing them.  Who in turn told my boss. She sympathized with me but said I had to eat crow and apologize. In the end that was the right thing to do but it was a bitter pill to accept.
  • Enjoy Eating Crow & As the Crow Flies at this feasting spot.

Number Two most viewed site was …..It’s Molting Time – Crows, Herons & Madrona Trees with 415 views.

Madrona Trees also molt this time of year. The bark is just like paper laying on the trail.
  • This post has the most staying power of all-time with 3,916 views. It was conceived in the fall of 2011 and every week someone reads it. I think it is the madrona trees molting that catches the traffic. They are a very special tree that molt at the same time as the birds I follow at the beach. But then again it could be the crows who sure don’t look black and shiny when in molt.
  • Check this out at Molting or you can just google “molting trees” and it will pop up on the second page.  Pretty cool to be a hot google item and it is my all time most visited post.

Drum Roll——>Number One most viewed site was ….. “Ruins of Longacres Racetrack – The Foundations” and it’s sister article “Longacres Racetrack – Vintage Aerials” with a combined 835 views.

Arial View of Longacres Racetrack – left to right – Gazebo, North Grandstand, Original Grandstand, Club house & Jockey House
Mossy stairs at foundations of Longacres Racetrack remains
  • The Foundations had a huge one day visit when a Facebook group “Seattle Vintage” had a feasting party of 514 views in November this year. Making a total of 633 in 2019
  • It also has an all time viewing total coming in second to Molting with 1,904 views.
  • Aerials is no slouch either with 202 views in 2019 and all time of 628.
  • These two are part of a series I wrote about what I found when I went down to where the old racetrack used to be. Boeing bought the property in the early 1990’s and bulldozed it down shortly thereafter.
  • Here is the opening on Foundations:

Ruins are often thought of as a tourist site such as the Ruins of Pompeii, the Acropolis or Delphi of Oracle. These are in distant places many of us can never see.  They do have one thing in common and that is they were places mankind gathered.  The area is imprinted with that activity with not only the remains of the structures but of the vibrations that do not dissipate over time.  In some cases they become more powerful and draw us to them.

Needless I say I am still drawn to these ruins and even a week ago was digging around researching my next article.

  • The aerials were a gift to me from an ex-employee who read my first couple of articles.  They are fascinating since they include the I-405 being built in the 1960’s.
  • Here are the links to the two posts.  You can find more by following the links at the end of these post.  Maybe it is time to make a directory post of them like I did Duwamish & Green River Adventures.   Foundations link    &   Aerials link

Well that ends my reminiscing on how Crows of Arroyos did in 2019.  Hope you saw something new and come back for more.  Wish you all a great 2020!!  A new decade awaits us.

Posted in My Duwamish Adventure

Our Only River – The Duwamish

My adventure to walk the Duwamish River ended at Jack Block Park. Here we are at the mouth of the river at last. It is a bittersweet moment for me. We expect a river to be beautiful and dreamy. I think my video will tell the story of how Seattle’s only River is not so magical as it was 150 years ago.

I encourage everyone to walk the trails in our city. What I learned being on the street instead of driving on the street was tremendous. One will learn history, talk to your neighbors, and find new parks and restaurants to visit.

Bicycling is another option but I have to say I was passed by many cyclist who were in nothing but a hurry to get somewhere.

It is a skill to dawdle and saunter in this day of instant everything. The phrase “Stop and smell the Roses” is more true than ever.

See you out there Seattle!! Put down your technology and look, listen and learn life.

To see all of my Duwamish Adventure I have a directory post that links all of the pieces together.  You can find that post here – My Duwamish Adventure Directory

Posted in My Duwamish Adventure

Going Rogue seeking the Duwamish River

I am close to the end of my journey on the Duwamish and had decided I would attempt to get closer to the mouth of the river. I studied the maps and earth view of Jack Block Park trying to figure out how I could get past the obstructions and fencing that the Port put in place. Not really sure if I could or if trespassing onto Port T-5 was the smartest thing to do.

This weekend I went to the Park to scout out my options. The maps online just didn’t give me the true elevation of the area so I could not tell how to sneak around the water side of the point. My plan was to take pictures and then return on a low tide day.

The picture above is what the area looks like from the dock where I took great pictures of Seattle and some video of the mouth. Note the concrete block wall that holds back the bridges and towers that are on the east side of the old rail left in a man-made gully. Yes the Port does not want us in this area except to enjoy the high viewing tower. Fences and hills have been put in our way to discourage folks like me.

Second rail ramp to sound - by tower
Second rail ramp to sound – by tower

They did give us picnic tables and a little safe beach but I wanted onto the beach closer to the river.

Picnic area at Jack Block Park
Picnic area at Jack Block Park
The beach I wanted to get to.
The beach I wanted to get to.

From up on the viewing tower you can see the old piers and the mouth of the river in sight. It was so close I could taste it. My quest was nearing its end and there was the river entering Elliott Bay.

Distance view of docks
Distance view of docks

But before I could get to the beach on the other side I had to get around that cement wall and the fences that were at the end of the rail spur.

View of Elliott Bay from Tower
View of Elliott Bay from Tower and rail spur I had to get past

As you can see I am up high but wanted to get down on the ground. I took lots of pictures thinking I would examine them at home and make my approach another day.

However, the rogue in my took over and on my way down the path I decided to take a closer look at the only way I could see that would work. It was only a little hop over a short fence and I was on my way next to the concrete block wall.

Off trail by block wall
Off trail by block wall

This looks back at the fence I climbed over and shows you how brushy it was back here. This was the best path since down on the water side was a rough rock edge that was slippery and wet from tides coming in and out. I chose sticker bushes over rock climbing.

 

More brier patch
Brier patch looking out at bay

So, I followed the wall around until I got to the area close to the rail that was fenced off.

Wiggling down the wall behind brush
Wiggling down the wall behind brush
Behind blackberry bushes off trail
Behind blackberry bushes off trail
At the concrete wall corner off trail
At the concrete wall corner off trail
Sticker bushes block the path to the point
Sticker bushes block the path to the point

Then I couldn’t get through the brush. It was so thick and full of blackberry bushes. If you have ever been in stickers, you know they poke and stick to your clothing. OUCH!

I decided the only way to get around was to get to the rock edge and climb around on that. So, I pushed through the brier, climbed over piles of cut down pine tree limbs and made it to the water.

Looking around point at no trespassing sign
Looking around point at no trespassing sign

There I was under the end of the rail spur and making it around the point.

Fencing at end of 2nd rail spur
Fencing at end of 2nd rail spur

Then I had rogue remorse. What you say? Yes I saw that big No Trespassing sign, the light towers with cameras and all this fencing. It convinced me that I would be tangling with an organization that would have me arrested. That experience on public property at the SE security gate was a mild taste of what I would encounter.

So, I turned back and went home.

But before I left the water’s edge, I took some great photos that you saw in previous posts. This was to be the closest I could get. What an exciting end to my journey.

What a difference my walking the Duwamish was to the Green River Trail journey. Our only river has been changed forever from a thing of beauty and nature to a place of industry and commerce.

The finale of this adventure is in this next post. I made a small film of the river’s end.  Hope you enjoy it.

Our only River – the Duwamish

To see all of my Duwamish Adventure I have a directory post that links all of the pieces together.  You can find that post here – My Duwamish Adventure Directory

Posted in My Duwamish Adventure

Duwamish and Port of Seattle T-5

The view of Port of Seattle Terminal 5 from the viewing tower at Jack Block Park shows how large this property is. It is empty of traffic for a remodel of the docks to accommodate larger ocean-going container ships.

Security around this facility is tight.  Here is a post I did several weeks ago about the shake down they did on me at the southeast entrance. From that side of the terminal I also got some good photos of the old red cranes that are synonyms with the Port of Seattle.  Terminal 5 Trouble

Everywhere I went in the Park which is owned and maintained by the Port of Seattle fencing was tight. No holes or even cracks are in them.  This is unlike other areas I traversed on the Duwamish. They are on alert since the environmentalist had a serious demonstration around the Shell Oil Drill Rig Polar Pioneer that was docked here. I will let my crow helpers show you a little bit about the fencing.

T-5 Fencing and local crows
T-5 Fencing and local crows
Cranes and Crows
Cranes and Crows

Let us talk about razor wire and fencing!  The Port used it with no thought of expense.

Serious Barb Wire at T-5
Serious Barb Wire at T-5
Northern backside of T-5 looking East towards Harbor Island
Northern backside of T-5 looking East towards Harbor Island
T-5 serious fencing at Jack Block Park
T-5 serious fencing at Jack Block Park

One thing I found interesting is how much I could see from the viewing tower of the terminal. Funny how this is feature was Port built so the public can see the city and bay. All one has to do is turn around and there is a panoramic view of their business they are trying so hard to hide. This next series of photos really gives you the lay of the land.

Looking SE at T-5 - Upgrade to Pier in progress
Looking SE at T-5 – Upgrade to Pier in progress
Three offshore Tugs and support ships at T-5
Three offshore Tugs and support ships at T-5
T-5 from Jack Block viewing tower looking South
T-5 from Jack Block viewing tower looking South
West side of T-5 with W Seattle in distance.
West side of T-5 with W Seattle in distance.

There are three ships docked currently at Terminal 5.  In my prior post you might remember seeing a photo of them.

Ships moored at T-5 on Duwamish waterway
Ships moored at T-5 on Duwamish waterway

This trip I was able to get better photos of them. They are from north to south on the dock – Ross Chouest, NANUQ and AIVIQ. The AIVIQ had some nasty business up in Alaska in 2014. The Kulluk a Shell Oil Drilling Rig was grounded after the AIVIQ lost control of it in tow. Here are a few articles about this wreak and how the Coast Guard was not happy with Shell and Edison Chouest, the owner of the AIVIQ.

USCG and Shell around tow of Kulluk Oil Rig

Nat Geo article on Kulluk wreak

Ross Chouest - Big Tug/Supply ship at T-5

Ross Chouest – Big Tug/Supply ship at T-5

NANUQ - Offshore Supply Ship at T-5
NANUQ – Offshore Supply Ship at T-5
AIVIQ - Offshore Supply Ship at T-5
AIVIQ – Offshore Supply Ship at T-5

My quest to walk the Duwamish has been full of things like T-5 where industry has control of our river. We the public benefit from the commercial use of the Duwamish but not all of the companies have been good stewards.

The Port of Seattle has done a lot of work to clean up other people’s messes. Jack Block Park sits on top of one of those areas. So, I shouldn’t be too unkind to them for wanting to beat out a buck and lease the dock temporarily for ships that are involved in drilling oil. It is a conundrum of our times. We want to use our fossil fuel cars but do not want to own up to our part in the extraction of oil.

To see all of my Duwamish Adventure I have a directory post that links all of the pieces together.  You can find that post here – My Duwamish Adventure Directory

Posted in My Duwamish Adventure

Terminal 5 Trouble

The Duwamish Adventure continued today.  I walked around the area where West Marginal intersects with Delridge and Spokane streets.  The mouth of the Duwamish is just to the northeast of this big Port of Seattle terminal.

Back street by W Marginal mega intersecton
Back street by W Marginal mega intersection

T-5 has been in the news lately because it was where a Shell Oil drilling rig docked. This created a huge environmentalist demonstration at this basically empty terminal.  That all ended about 6 months ago in June of 2015 when the rig left for Alaska.

The Port is in the process of modernizing it to accommodate larger ships and replace aging dock and cranes.  They stopped moving containers in late July of 2014.  The Shell/Foss lease is a short-term use of the area while the Port gets ready for the updates.  Here is some signage I found next to the Chelan Cafe before I wandered down West Marginal Way towards their offices and security check point.

Terminal 5 land use sign
Terminal 5 land use sign
Map of T-5 on notice of land use
Map of T-5 on notice of land use

Wherever I go there are crows showing their stuff.  As I walked through an empty office parking lot I pulled out my small camera and snapped shots of a crow watching the West Seattle Freeway traffic from a light pole.  There was also a BNSF rail car with graffiti on it that I snapped a photo of.  Then I turned around and took a snap of the security gate area.

I was using the small pocket Canon instead of my bigger Nikon that today was on a tripod for stability.  My instincts often tell me to put the big camera away so I don’t get robbed or noticed as much.

As I started to exit the parking lot and walk back towards the mega intersection on West Marginal I heard this faint voice.  It was a security guard chasing me down.  She asked me what I was doing there and was telling me in no uncertain terms I should not be there.  Even accuse me of trespassing.  Technically I was since I was in their parking lot but it is a public street down here.  Here is a look at where I was.  You can see I was in public right-aways.  The red x is the security gate and the blue x is where I was.

Map of T-5 Security area
Map of T-5 Security area

She was not happy with me. So, I told her I had just taken some pictures of the crow up on the light pole and the trains.  She wanted to see the pictures to make sure I didn’t leave with photos of T-5.  As if they aren’t already out there in the internet.  That was when I pulled out my little camera and showed her the following pictures of the T-5 Sign, the train and the crow.

Then there was the picture of the security gate and building I had taken.  I was forced to delete it. As I said the funny part is there are pictures out there of this area.  Just do a google street view and you will get the following picture.  Plus when I walked further up the Alki Trail that parallels Spokane street I got another picture.

Google picture of T-5 Security like my deleted photo
Google picture of T-5 Security like my deleted photo
Terminal Security from distance
Terminal Security from distance

To keep peace I deleted it with a smile.  Talked to her a few more minutes and in that time realized how jumpy she was.  They assumed I was one of the environmental groups getting info on them.  When I tried to flip her badges over to see who she was and what her rights to interrogate me was.. she got even more defensive and said don’t touch me.  In hind sight I should haven’t have done that.

Told her I was leaving and walked away.  She watched me for a long time.  As I was getting back onto “free land” next to the cafe and West Marginal I saw a van out of the corner of my eye coming from the gate.  I rounded the bend to where the cafe has a fenced in smoking area for the bar.  There were three guys smoking cigars.  I told them my story and they were shocked.  It was then we turned around and there was the security van with lights on watching to be sure I really left the premises.  That includes the public street back there.  Uggg I figured they would be touchy but never like that.

But the best part was she didn’t even realize that I had my Nikon in my cloth bag with lots of photos of the pier and ships on the dock.  I am sure they would have been gone too if I had not had the instinct to hide that camera. Here are a few of those saved photos.  I will use more of them in future posts too.

Cranes and Space Needle in background
Cranes and Space Needle in background
Ships moored at T-5 on Duwamish waterway
Ships moored at T-5 on Duwamish waterway

After I left the back of the cafe, I got some more photos of T-5 from the bike trail. Last week I had done some reconnaissance on the area and noticed an open gate to the railroad that paralleled the terminal. Yes I was thinking of using that open gate to get access.  Guess what?  After that security shakedown and looking at the how the train guys were active there I decided it would not be a good idea to go inside that open gate.  Not at all!!

Open gate to BNSF railroad yard at T-5
Open gate to BNSF railroad yard at T-5

You can see there is a fence I would have encountered after risking life and limb crossing the railroad.  Wise decision I think to stay on the trail.

T-5 truck check in between rail cars
T-5 truck check in between rail cars

The next picture gives you an idea of the size of this area.  If I could get to the river it would have been a lot of walking.

T-5 from distance
T-5 from distance

That is my story today of trouble at Terminal 5.

I am still excited that I got down to the Duwamish and am now very close to the end of my adventure.  Stay tuned for a few more posts with the other sights I saw today.  In the weeks to come Jack Block Park is my next walk. That is at the tip of T-5 and next to the mouth of the river.  Then I can say mission completed!!

To see more of my Duwamish Adventure I have a directory post that links all of the pieces together.  You can find that post here – My Duwamish Adventure Directory

Posted in My Duwamish Adventure

Riverside and West Seattle Bridges

Follow my meandering around the old community of Riverside next to the West Seattle Bridge. Let us start with some of the buildings that have survived.  Several of them are now abandoned or being worked on while others are freshly painted and loved.

This building faced onto West Marginal Way SW and must have been a business from how the front facade is shaped.  The back was built to accommodate the proprietor of either a store or saloon.  I found it was built in 1914 but now has a rollup garage door in the front and tattered curtains in the windows out back.

Front of old 1914 store or saloon.
Front of old 1914 store or saloon.
1914 store or saloon with house on back
1914 store or saloon with house on back
this was someones home and business over 100 yrs ago
this was someones home and business over 100 yrs ago

The other building that really stood out to me was this office for Global Diving. It dates back to the 1920s and must have been something special. They have treated her well and she is clean, repaired and showing her stuff.

Lovely building built in the 1920s on West Marginal Way SW
Lovely building built in the 1920s on West Marginal Way SW
1920's Building embellishment
1920’s Building embellishment

Here is a street view of Riverside so you can see how close the Duwamish with the railroad bridge as a landmark.

BNSF train bridge from Riverside
BNSF train bridge from Riverside
Streets of Riverside
Streets of Riverside

This community has seen many West Seattle Bridges come and go.  Currently there are a pair of them.  One is a highrise that never has to close for boat traffic which was the demise of the prior bridge.  The lower one is a swivel bridge that opens for taller marine traffic.  Here are a few photos of the two.

If you have been following my Duwamish Adventure, you will know that under bridges are those less fortunate.  The West Seattle Bridge has a combination of old RVs, a Seafarers center and some restoration of the marsh under her.

I found a few odd little things too.

Lock randomly latched to fence in T-105
Lock randomly latched to fence in T-105

 

Fairy wings caught in tree
Fairy wings caught in tree

To my surprise under the bridges I found that the Duwamish Trail ends there and two new trails begin.

Deadend under West Seattle Bridge
Deadend under West Seattle Bridge
Underskirt of upper West Seattle Bridge at Riverside
Underskirt of upper West Seattle Bridge at Riverside
Duwamish Trail ends here under W Sea Bridge
Duwamish Trail ends here under W Sea Bridge

To see more of my Duwamish Adventure I have a directory post that links all of the pieces together.  You can find that post here – My Duwamish Adventure Directory

Posted in My Duwamish Adventure

T-105 Park Train experience

I had parked at T-105 and after investigating the park I started out of the gate to walk around Riverside and the West Seattle Bridge.  Along comes this train and I captured how this area is more industrial than anything.

West Marginal Way SW and Train Tracks
West Marginal Way SW and Train Tracks

The horn was so loud I had to cover my ear next to it.  I also waved at the Engineer and you can see him wave back if you look closely.   Enjoy!!

To see more of my Duwamish Adventure I have a directory post that links all of the pieces together.  You can find that post here – My Duwamish Adventure Directory

Posted in My Duwamish Adventure

T-105 Port of Seattle Park

Terminal 105 Park was reclaimed by the Port of Seattle into a park from industrial land on the Duwamish. They began this process in 1995 a few years before they worked on T-107 and the City of Seattle created Herring’s House Park.

This park is a little ways north of the twin parks.  It is a narrow piece of land that gives the public access to the river.  You can park at the entrance area and walk down the road next to the reclaimed slough or you can park at the picnic area.  There is limited turn around or parking at that end so be careful if you go.

Restored Slough area with CalPortland looming
Restored Slough area with CalPortland looming

They have reclaimed the land to include a slough like tidal area.  This is on the south side of the road to the river.  On the north side is a fence and row of trees that shield us from a gravel and rock plant.  When I left a truck was loading medium size boulders onto a dump truck.

Industry next to T-105 Park
Industry next to T-105 Park

Once you get down to the river there is a picnic area, pier and landscaped grass area.  The pier seems to have some structural issues since I last was here.  They have it chain link fenced off.  Wonder if a boat or barge hit it?

Pier at T-105 is closed due to unsafe structure
Pier at T-105 is closed due to unsafe structure

Here are a few shots of the nice covered picnic area.

T-105 Picnic area & garden
T-105 Picnic area & garden
Picnic time at T-105
Picnic time at T-105

While I was there several water craft came by.  Here is one I captured next to the barges being unloaded at the gravel plant.

Duwamish Boat Traffic from T-105
Duwamish Boat Traffic from T-105

Off to the south end of the park area is a grassy area where I discovered a Duwamish Revealed art installation.  Here is a link to that.  Art at T-105

There is also a small boat launch off to the south of this grass area and I was able to get down on the beach to take some pictures of birds, pilings, the river and best of all Mt Rainier.

Duwamish & Mt Rainier from T-105
Duwamish & Mt Rainier from T-105

To see more of my Duwamish Adventure I have a directory post that links all of the pieces together.  You can find that post here – My Duwamish Adventure Directory

Posted in My Duwamish Adventure

Underpinning and Beacon at T-105

Duwamish Revealed has been active this last year. When I went to T-105 Park guess what I found?  Another art installation!

This time it is two wooden sculptures designed by Jay Lazerwitz – Underpinning and Beacon.

When you arrive at this small grass area in the park you first see Underpinning.

DSCN7953

Underpinning - Jay Lazerwitz part of Duwamish Revealed
Underpinning – Jay Lazerwitz part of Duwamish Revealed

A little to the right and closer to the small boat launch is Beacon.

DSCN7960

Beacon - Jay Lazerwitz part of Duwamish Revealed
Beacon – Jay Lazerwitz part of Duwamish Revealed

To see more of my Duwamish Adventure I have a directory post that links all of the pieces together.  You can find that post here – My Duwamish Adventure Directory

Posted in My Duwamish Adventure

Railroad Bridge Duwamish River

On the south side of the West Seattle Bridges (upper & lower) and north of T-105 Park is the BNSF Railroad Bridge. In my walk around Riverside this bridge drew me over to it since it stands straight up and appears to have been around more than a few years.

To get to the bridge I walked down the tracks hoping that no one would call me out.  That did not happen so I got some great photos of it and the river itself.  This was a bit nerve-wracking since walking on the rails is a dangerous thing.  I keep looking behind me for a train and had an exit plan in my head. Also, walking on rails is not easy with lots of trip hazards to watch for. As soon as I got close to the rail bridge I climbed down into the parking lot to get off the tracks.

Walking up to the West Seattle Duwamish Railroad bridge
Walking up to the West Seattle Duwamish Railroad bridge.

I have done some research on this bridge and found that it was originally built in 1911 by Northern Pacific Railroad.  It was then reconstructed in 1928 into its current configuration and is now owned by Burlington Northern.  Here is an excerpt from Bridgehunter.com with more details.

In 1911 the Northern Pacific railroad constructed a Strauss heel trunnion of the Strauss bascule bridge company with the 2 dc motors of 25 horsepower the machinery was installed on the end of the bascule span, the struts attached to the counterweight bridge tower.

The Strauss heel trunnion bascule which formerly use by the Northern Pacific railroad was repaired in 1928 that the operating machinery was removed, built in the machinery inside the counterweight bridge tower, the strut was transferred from the bridge tower to the bascule truss to support the counterweight and notice the framework was change in place. The span is in the better suited operation.

Written by Douglas Butler at Duwamish Railroad bridge – Bridgehunter.com

This following series of photos start at the top and move down towards the tenders building.

DSCN8001
Top of Duwamish River BNSF railroad bridge
DSCN8002
Middle of Duwamish River BNSF railroad bridge
DSCN8003
Duwamish River BNSF railroad bridge with old Northern Pacific Logo
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Bottom of Duwamish River BNSF railroad bridge

To see more of my Duwamish Adventure I have a directory post that links all of the pieces together.  You can find that post here – My Duwamish Adventure Directory