Posted in History and other topics

Georgetown Old Grocery – Gas Station

When I left the Georgetown Steam Plant I saw this sad deserted Grocery.  I found that this building was originally built in 1917.  It was the Chris M Perovich Grocery for many years. At some point in recent history it became Mini Mart City Park.  Then it was left to rot.

Time gone by Grocery at 6525 Corson Ave, Seattle, WA
Time gone by Grocery at 6525 Ellis Ave, Seattle, WA

A local artist has built a folk art rock sculpture (Georgetown resident Louie Moss) which includes extensive rock, petrified wood and stone design elements has been added to the east side of the building. It has been the subject of some controversy within the Georgetown community.

Folk Art on front of old Grocery in Georgetown
Folk Art on front of old Grocery in Georgetown

This buildings future is unknown but it is listed by the city in its inventory of Georgetown historical sites.

One last note for you is my grandparents ran a small local grocery gas station in the Northgate area.  This was in the 1930s and 40s and my grandmother sold Shell Gas using the old glass type pumps.  Funny how today a month later I took a picture of one of these old style pumps.

Old Gas Pump in Duwamish River back yard.
Old Gas Pump in Duwamish River back yard.

 

Posted in Georgetown Steam Plant

Haunted Georgetown Steam Plant

When I got home from my adventure at the Georgetown Steam Plant I quickly looked at my 180 plus photos.  I discovered some disturbing things that I cannot explain except that they are paranormal.  The one that really caught my eye was where a heap of electrical cable was piled.  The last photo in the series is a glow and I have no explanation for this.

Let me set the stage for this.  I had already walked around the big boiler room area. That area as you can see from the other posts was large, creepy and a step into the past.  As I turned the corner back at the entrance end I saw this pile of cable.  Not sure why I was so fascinated by this ugly pile but here is the series of photos I took.

Electrical Cable - close up - 1st photo no flash
Electrical Cable – close up – 1st photo no flash
Pile of cable - 2nd photo with flash
Pile of cable – 2nd photo with flash
pile of cable - 3rd photo no flash
pile of cable – 3rd photo no flash

In this next fourth photo where did the glow come from?  This room has limited light and no way is this from an outside source or my camera.  I had the flash turned off and you can check the photo properties if you like.  I almost thought it was my shaking the camera but look at how clear the cable looks.

Glowing pile - final photo & no flash
Glowing pile – final photo & no flash

Next set of photos that had something creepy going on is a set of boiler doors.  These two doors are right across from the cable.  Coincidence?

Boiler doors - no flash taken after creepy photo
Boiler doors – no flash taken after creepy photo
Little Boiler door close up
Little Boiler door close up

At first I thought again this was just a bad photo moment.  However, with no flash used and the bands of light coming from the door it makes me wonder… is this a spirit or a poltergeist living in the boiler room?

The light is coming from or around the smaller boiler door
The light is coming from or around the smaller boiler door

The last example I have is not as obvious but has a higher creepy factor.  It is when I went back down those enclosed cement stairs that reminded me of Alcatraz.  By accident I took a picture of the stairs with my feet in the picture.  I don’t like to get my shadow or body in pictures.  No selfies for me.

Neither of these two pictures used a flash but in the one with my feet it has a glow or some unexplained aura. Yes it was right at my feet. Glad I was holding onto the railing. Remember my fear of heights in earlier posts.  That was a good thing I hung on huh?

Staircase after the glowing photo with my feet.
Staircase after the glowing photo with my feet. – No Flash used.
No flash photo with light blob glowing at my feet.
No flash photo with light blob glowing at my feet.

I could not find much on the Steam Plant being haunted.  The one thing I did find was the Georgetown Halloween walk from a prior year mentioned that the building might have a poltergeist.  That would explain the glowing lights on the cable and boiler door.  However, the glow in the stairs were more like a spirit due to the temperature and bad vibe I had.

What do you think?  Not sure we will ever really know but this world has lots of things we can’t explain.

Want more of the Georgetown Steam Plant?  Go to my master post on this subject for the other topics around this historic place.

More Georgetown Steam Plant

Posted in Georgetown Steam Plant

Georgetown Steam Plant Building of time gone by

My trip to Seattle Electric Company 1906 building aka Georgetown Steam Plant was a step back in time mechanically and technologically.

Machines and more machines
Machines and more machines

If you look behind this machine you will see the elevator cage that is used to store signs. This cage does not belong to the building but I found the iron work lovely.

Elevator cage iron work
Elevator cage iron work

Then there is the boiler room, a combination of pipes, doors and dials.  Add to this a creepy factor that we all discussed as we stood there in awe.

Big Boiler Room - 8 to each side
Big Boiler Room – 8 to each side
Boilers with Seattle Electric Company on them.
Boilers with Seattle Electric Company on them.

 

Boiler doors
Boiler doors

I leave you with one of  the turbines or the heart of the plant.

 

Curtis Turbine
Curtis Turbine

Want more of the Georgetown Steam Plant?  Go to my master post on this subject for the other topics around this historic place.

More Georgetown Steam Plant

Posted in Georgetown Steam Plant

Georgetown Steam Plant Pipes

The 1906 Steam Plant was full of pipes large and small.  They were made of brass, metal and painted over in different colors.  They carried oil, water, steam and who knows what else.

Lets have a walk around the plant and see what we can find.

Look up and you see pipes

The ceiling is a honeycomb of piping.
The ceiling is a honeycomb of piping.

These brass pipes were on the side of the turbines.  Oil or steam?

Brass pipes
Brass pipes

Up in the boiler room the pipes and valves were everywhere.  When I looked between the boilers looking to the west sunshine I got this photo. The spooky factor was high in this room.

Creepy space between boilers
Creepy space between boilers

The boilers were eight on each side.  Down at the southern end of the long room the light streamed in from a window high up.  It gave this shot of the front of the boilers two different tones of color.  Add more pipes and gauges to the picture for a good photo opportunity.

Front of two boilers
Front of two boilers

Later you will see a picture of the coiled heavy electrical cable that I was drawn to.  After I took several photos of that I weaved behind that area and found this huge pipe and valve wheel.

Big pressure pipe and control wheel.
Big pressure pipe and control wheel.

I leave you with two more sets of pipes at the Steam Plant.

Want more of the Georgetown Steam Plant?  Go to my master post on this subject for the other topics around this historic place.

More Georgetown Steam Plant

Posted in Georgetown Steam Plant

Seattle Steam Plant Gauges of time

Georgetown Steam Plant was full of gauges and control panels.  Let’s talk about visual overload for my camera and me.

Similar to the Seattle Electric Company Plant Stairways post let us go around the building in order that I saw them.

At first I was fascinated by these oilers.  The workmanship of the brass and glass is from a time before things were made in foreign countries.

This next piece of the machinery must have twirled and turned as the machine worked.

imagine this in motion
imagine this in motion

Then I turned to the big generator made by General Electric over 100 years ago.  Not only do I have good shots of its inner workings but of the manufacture’s plate.

Generator up close
Generator up close

Let us get down to the gauges and there was plenty of them.  Some looked like they belonged on a ship and some had pipes and faucets around them.  A delight to the mechanical eye.

In the boiler room area there was a few tools and other odd things from the century past.  They were dusty and just lying around like the workers had left them decades ago. This added to the unsettling feeling that I had interrupted someone. I was fascinated by this old heater and how its coils on the outside were visually delightful.

Old space heater a graphic treat
Old space heater a graphic treat

Remember the mystery stairs photo?  At the same time I came out of the boiler room and took that shot I captured the control panels on the third level. This multiple tier kind of reminded me of Alcatraz too.

Control Panels of yesterday look like today
Control Panels of yesterday looks modern

This next photo gives you a better look at the start stop dial and the wench hook that hung from the ceiling. I recently received a comment from Clyde Furd who told me that the dial may look like a clock (which is what I thought it was originally) but it really shows the electrical output of the plant when it is running. It has numbers from 0 to 25 megawatts.  The hook in the upper right corner is a 50 ton crane.

Start Stop clock and control panels
Start Stop clock and control panels

Want more of the Georgetown Steam Plant?  Go to my master post on this subject for the other topics around this historic place.

More Georgetown Steam Plant

 

Posted in Georgetown Steam Plant

Seattle Electric Company Plant Stairways

The Steam Plant in Georgetown had some amazing stairway photo opportunities.  The site is multiple leveled so the workers could get to all the huge machinery in the building.

The feature photo was one I captured when looking at gauges.  Then I saw light from the big windows at the back of the building was illuminating the stairs and pipes.

Let us take a tour of the stairs in the building.  I am going to show you them in order of my discovery.  We entered the building by the back big door.  Then were directed to the left to circle around into the machinery area on the main floor.  The other option was to take the back stairs up to the second level.  I opted for machinery first.   This photo looks back toward the entrance and combines lots of visual variety.

Machinery, pipes and stairs
Machinery, pipes and stairs

After I wandered around the machinery I decided to take these enclosed stairs.  They wind up and into an office that had old newspaper articles. Having been to Alcatraz years ago I would say this set of stairs was just as spooky. Guess I picked creepy over the back stairs that made me queasy with height phobia.

Speaking of those back stairs that made my fear of heights act up.  Here is a shot of them from the second floor.  I had a hard time overpowering my fear to get close to the rail here.

This area gave me leapaphobia
This area gave me leapaphobia

After I wandered around the boiler area that continued to sustain the creepy feeling, I came upon this set of stairs going up towards the top of the boilers.  To the side were more oven type doors but they were painted red vs the black ones lower on the boilers.

Stairs upward in boiler room
Stairs upward in boiler room

Next when I moved back into the room with the turbines, I looked up behind the control panels and saw this next staircase.  It seemed to be lighted from the roof and I couldn’t tell where it came from or went.  Thus I named it mystery stairs.

Mystery stairs in rooftop distance
Mystery stairs in rooftop distance

Then the last shot I took was of the one at the back of the building.  Full circle was made.

Back of the house stairs to second level
Back of the house stairs to second level

Want more of the Georgetown Steam Plant?  Go to my master post on this subject for the other topics around this historic place.

More on Georgetown Steam Plant

 

Posted in History and other topics

Seattle Malting & Brewing – Rainier Beer Roots

Last weekend I went to an estate sale published to be in the Old Rainier Brewery.  I went to this sale just because I wanted to investigate the old Georgetown brewing buildings.   They are that old red brick kind that go for blocks along Airport Way. I have memories of my mom going downtown before the freeway along this street and using it for years as a quick route north.  It was at one point 885 feet of old building right next to a two lane road.  It gave me childhood wonder of old things and history every time we went by.

I found after I drove around the buildings twice that the sale was in the next generation Rainier Brewery that was further north.  That is the building that many of us in Seattle know from the Big R on top of it beside the I-5 Freeway. In the end the sale was good because I found a couple of Worlds Fair items that were not advertised and even under priced.

However, today’s article is about the first brewery I went to, the Seattle Malting and Brewing Company. This was the roots of Rainier Beer and a huge operation in its day.

DSCN4924

According to History Link.Org and Paul Dorpat these buildings were built around 1900. The brewery by 1904 was the largest brewery west of the Mississippi River and with addition upon addition through 1912 it became “world class” – the sixth largest in the world. For a time before Washington State introduced prohibition in 1916, the Georgetown brewery was the largest industrial establishment in the state of Washington.  Here is a link to read a little bit more on the brewery and a picture taken by Asahel Curtis when it was still a new building.

http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=3001

DSCN4929

This photo shows how the area has been revitalized with new businesses.  The Frans candy company has a lovely boutique type sales area with manufacturing behind it.  I saw a small box for sale at the grocery store later that day and we loved the salted caramels.

DSCN4932

This next photo is a good past and present.  See the old buildings embellishments next to a modern times outdoor light.   Even that light isn’t that new but in comparison it is a late comer.

DSCN4935

The back of any place has some dirty underwear showing.  Check out the over 100-year-old stairway with a ladder for easy access.

Hope you enjoyed a little Seattle history.